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Image from page 176 of “Outdoor life and Indian stories : making open air life attractive to young Americans by telling them all about woodcraft, signs and signaling, the stars, fishing, camping … : also stories of noted hunters and scouts, great Indian
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Identifier: outdoorlifeindia00elli
Title: Outdoor life and Indian stories : making open air life attractive to young Americans by telling them all about woodcraft, signs and signaling, the stars, fishing, camping … : also stories of noted hunters and scouts, great Indians and warriors … all of them true and interesting
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Ellis, Edward Sylvester, 1840-1916
Subjects: Indians of North America Camping
Publisher: [Philadelphia? : s.n.
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ust could be placed in those of th<*other race, and sad indeed was it for the Moravian Christiansthat they did not act upon his own counsel. Before entering Salem, the chief made all his warri-ors leave their guns behind, so as not to alarm their hosts.When ready toleave, he turnedand addressedthe assembledChristians thank-ing them for theirhospitality, andassuring themthat they couldalways dependupon his stead-fast friendship. The following incident will illustrate a peculiar phase ofthe character of this remarkable man : One of the most noted scouts connected with ColonelBrodheads army, and afterward with Harmar, St. Clair andWayne, was an Irishman named Murphy. He was a rollick-ing fellow, with all the wit and waggery of his people, brave tothe last degree, and a master of woodcraft. Some of the exploitswith which he is credited sound incredible. No Indian couldfollow a shadowy^ trail through the woods more truly, and fewwere his equal in resources and quickness to see the right

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A FIGHT AT ODDS 164 WARRIOR AND KNIGHT thing to do in a crisis. He was tall, bony, homely of fea-ture, with a shock of fiery red hair and a freckled countenance.With many, his greatest gift was his fleetness of foot. In allthe races in which he engaged he never met his superior.Simon Kenton, who, in his prime, could run like a deer, saidMurphy was able to lead every one else. This point became well known to the Indians, and manyof them put forth their utmost efforts to capture him. Awareof the valuable help he gave to the whites, they would havegiven much to lay hands on him. He had slain and scalped(sad to say that barbarous practice was not confined to the redmen) some of their most noted warriors, and there would havebeen general rejoicing among all the tribes could the meansbe found to check his destroying career. Well, disaster came to Murphy at last. He had a hardfight with three Delawares, one summer afternoon, in thedepths of the wilderness. He shot one, wounded the second,and

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