Posts tagged ‘Corporate’

Corporate Management of Identity

Contest is good in the market world nowadays and in order to get your business organisation discovered, you will need great corporate identity management. You need to bring together all of the good qualities of your company as well as emphasizing what a great benefit your company will be to those who use your servicing. Good corporate identity management will do just that if handled right. It will give your business organisation a clear positioning towards your clients and future customers as well as your staff, suppliers, agencies, and even your competition. By making your business easily distinctive to those who want what your selling, corporate identity management will also play a key part in the evolution and maintenance of your business, and keep it running like a good oiled machine.

In today’s world, we are all barraged with information, every waking minute. Globalization increases competition, products are similar, and new products come to the market at an ever faster rate. Every business organisation is competing for our attention. Choice of a supplier is not solely based on price or availability anymore; clients have the luxuriousness to choose providers they can identify with. That is why your company will need an edge of some kind so that when people decide they need the service that you’re providing, either your logo, or a witty saying, will automatically pop into the consumers mind, in turn, they will seek you out. Nevertheless, your business organisation image is not the only thing that will get you noticed. How the press and advertisers comprehend your company will rub off on the public also, so you will always need to stay coherent and make a good picture.

Consistency is very essential in the business world today, unless you want to loose your business before it even gets off the ground, you can’t say one thing then completely do another. In order to ensure consistency in communication, you may need to ask for help from somebody who knows their doing when it comes to corporate identity management. There are many good organizations that can help you do just that. They can take your company and create something that will be distributed all over, no matter what you’re selling.

Other important aspect is that your staff needs to be able to identity with your company’s corporate identity so they feel comfortable with it. From your company’s reception area, to telephone manners, the design of all published materials and World Wide Web sites, to public relations, every aspect of a business has to breathe its Corporate Identity to be credible and distinguishable. Only then will your business organisation have the chance of being taken seriously in the market, and ultimately to succeed. The primary idea behind a corporate identity platform is everything your business does, own, and service it provides, should project a clear idea of what you and your business goals are. A good corporate identity management organization works well and keeps the essential things on tract.

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Warren Buffett on Credit Rating Agencies, Moody’s, S&P, Bonds, and Corporate Shareholders

Moody’s Investors Service, often referred to as Moody’s, is the bond credit rating business of Moody’s Corporation, representing the company’s traditional line of business and its historical name. Moody’s Investors Service provides international financial research on bonds issued by commercial and government entities and, with Standard & Poor’s and Fitch Group, is considered one of the Big Three credit rating agencies.

The company ranks the creditworthiness of borrowers using a standardized ratings scale which measures expected investor loss in the event of default. Moody’s Investors Service rates debt securities in several market segments related to public and commercial securities in the bond market. These include government, municipal and corporate bonds; managed investments such as money market funds, fixed-income funds and hedge funds; financial institutions including banks and non-bank finance companies; and asset classes in structured finance.[1] In Moody’s Investors Service’s ratings system securities are assigned a rating from Aaa to C, with Aaa being the highest quality and C the lowest quality.

Moody’s was founded by John Moody in 1909 to produce manuals of statistics related to stocks and bonds and bond ratings. In 1975, the company was identified as a Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (NRSRO) by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Following several decades of ownership by Dun & Bradstreet, Moody’s Investors Service became a separate company in 2000; Moody’s Corporation was established as a holding company.

In the late 1960s and 1970s, commercial paper and bank deposits began to be rated. As well, the major agencies began charging the issuers of bonds as well as investors — Moody’s began doing this in 1970[5] — thanks in part to a growing free rider problem related to the increasing availability of inexpensive photocopy machines,[14] and the increased complexity of the financial markets.[10][15] Rating agencies also grew in size as the number of issuers grew exponentially,[16] both in the United States and abroad, making the credit rating business significantly more profitable. In 2005 Moody’s estimated that 90% of credit rating agency revenues came from issuer fees.[17]

The end of the Bretton Woods system in 1971 led to the liberalization of financial regulations, and the global expansion of capital markets in the 1970s and 1980s.[5] In 1975, the SEC changed its minimum capital requirements for broker-dealers, using bond ratings as a measurement. Moody’s and nine other agencies (later five, due to consolidation) were identified by the SEC as “nationally recognized statistical ratings organizations” (NRSROs) for broker-dealers to use in meeting these requirements.[3][18]

The 1980s and beyond saw the global capital market expand; Moody’s opened its first overseas offices in Japan in 1985, followed by offices in the United Kingdom in 1986, France in 1988, Germany in 1991, Hong Kong in 1994, India in 1998 and China in 2001.[5] The number of bonds rated by Moody’s and the Big Three agencies grew substantially as well. As of 1997, Moody’s was rating about trillion in securities from 20,000 U.S. and 1,200 non-U.S. issuers.[12] The 1990s and 2000s were also a time of increased scrutiny, as Moody’s was sued by unhappy issuers and investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice,[19] as well as criticism following the collapse of Enron, the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis and subsequent late-2000s financial crisis.[5][20]

Following several years of rumors and pressure from institutional shareholders,[21] in December 1999 Moody’s parent Dun & Bradstreet announced it would spin off Moody’s Investors Service into a separate publicly traded company. Although Moody’s had fewer than 1,500 employees in its division, it represented about 51% of Dun & Bradstreet profits in the year before the announcement.[22] The spin-off was completed on September 30, 2000,[23] and, in the half decade that followed, the value of Moody’s shares improved by more than 300%.[12]

In June 2013, Moody’s Investor Service has warned that Thailand’s country’s credit rating may be damaged due to an increasingly costly rice-pledging scheme which lost 200 billion baht (.5 billion) in 2011-2012.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moody%27s
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Corporate Social Responsibility 101: Working Wardrobes Offers CSR Tips to Help Businesses Make a Big Impact


(PRWEB) July 15, 2014

The employment experts at Working Wardrobes recently outlined the benefits of businesses having a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) plan, and offered tips to help implement one – to make a big impact over the long haul. The Orange County, California-based nonprofit that provides career readiness and life skills services to men, women, young adults and veterans facing difficult life challenges, says that in addition to having a positive impact on the communities in which we live, CSR can boost business too.

“Today, an increasing number of companies measure success by social and environmental impact, in addition to profits,” said Jerri Rosen, founder and CEO of Working Wardrobes. “CSR serves a number of purposes – from enabling an organization to stay compliant with business ethics and the law, furthering goodwill by giving back to the community, or by being environmentally responsible.”

Rosen said that before getting started, businesses should consider the benefits that a solid CSR strategy can bring, including:


    A positive reputation and increased brand awareness.
A recent study1 found that a majority of consumers are willing to recommend companies they believe are delivering on their social responsibility programs. And another study2 found that one in three consumers use social media to share positive information about companies and issues, and one in four use social media to share negative information. In today’s word-of-mouth-world, positive opinions about a company can help boost its reputation quickly and significantly.

    Increased sales and ultimately, enhanced revenue.
Today, CSR is also driving consumer behavior and purchases. If given the choice between two products of similar price and quality, most consumers will switch brands to one that supports a good cause2. Consumers will also boycott a brand if they learn of the company’s irresponsible business practices2.

    Improved recruitment, retention, and overall business processes.
Studies show that employee morale and loyalty increase when the company they work for offers opportunities through CSR initiatives3. And since companies look to hire the most talented employees, and many prospective employees seek organizations to work for based on what that company’s social conscious is, CSR also serves as a tool for employee engagement. Many companies are now encouraging their employees, at all levels, to get involved by volunteering and/or offering pro bono services, and the positive results are tenfold. Employees who feel good about the company they work for tend to be more engaged, which can lead to increased productivity.

    The positive results of making a real impact.
Simply put, affecting positive change is good for everyone involved. When a company helps change something for the better, by way of long-term corporate partnerships, monetary donations, or by offering volunteer services, the community as a whole improves.

Daniel J. McQuaid, President & CEO of OneOC, a nonprofit that accelerates nonprofit success through volunteer, training, consulting, and business services, says that all companies can benefit from implementing Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives.

“CSR opportunities are great for all size companies,” said McQuaid. “Many of our larger employers are already doing a wonderful job addressing our community’s urgent and unmet needs. However, we believe there is significant opportunity for more mid-size companies to follow suit. In Orange County, there are 4,500 companies with 50 to 1,000 employees that have an enormous potential to transform the landscape of our community through implementing giving and volunteering activities. For these companies, mobilizing CSR efforts can be an easy and effective way to build their teams and reap the benefits of being a good corporate citizen.”

McQuaid and Rosen point to the Civic 50, an annual study released by Bloomberg Business, National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC) and Points of Light, which identifies the nation’s most community-minded businesses4. The study evaluated S&P 500 corporations and how they best used company philanthropy and employee volunteerism to impact their employees, customers, and communities. The Civic 50 were evaluated on the following key dimensions:

1)    Make the commitment.

Once a company decides to focus on CSR initiatives, it should commit to putting a plan in place and carrying it out. Buy in from all levels of management is critical.

2)    Invest strategically.

Companies should decide how extensively (and in what ways) they can best apply their resources to give back to, and improve, the community.

3)    Complement your business.

A successful CSR initiative will complement and support a company’s own business interests. Companies should work to identify community engagement opportunities that align closely with their business goals.

4)    Foster the culture.

Companies with success in CSR have done their best to embed the spirit of giving into their corporate culture by incorporating it within company policies. They invite employees to participate in volunteer opportunities within the community, and many companies are now evaluating employee performance in part based on their participation with the company’s community engagement.

5)    Measure the impact.

It’s really not enough to have and implement CSR initiatives. Measuring the impact is vitally important. Gauging the performance of its community engagement allows a company to see where it is successful and where it is making an impact, what it can do to increase or enhance the impact, and what is working and what is not to optimize performance.

“Joining forces with a nonprofit organization is a great way to give back to the community, and finding a like-minded organization that aligns with the company’s mission, goals, or business interests enhances a CSR strategy,” said Rosen.

Jeff Coats, president and CEO of Irvine-based Autobytel Inc., pioneer of the automotive Internet and the company dedicated to connecting automotive consumers with dealers, says his organization signed on to support Working Wardrobes after creating T.E.A.M. ABT (The Employee Advocacy Members of Autobytel), an internal “Good Works Council” to focus its CSR efforts and to identify local charities to support.

“We firmly believe in the employment services Working Wardrobes provides to people overcoming difficult challenges, and we are continually impressed by the improvements Jerri and her team are making in our community,” said Jeff Coats, president and CEO of Irvine-based Autobytel Inc. “Working Wardrobes has served the Southern California community for nearly 25 years, and we’re proud to support its efforts in helping people in need find jobs. We encourage other businesses to offer their support as well.”

To learn more about the services Working Wardrobes provides, visit the nonprofit’s website at http://www.WorkingWardrobes.org, or call (714) 210-2460.

1 Reputation Institute’s 2013 Global CSR RepTrak® 100 study, October 2013: http://www.reputationinstitute.com/frames/events/2013_CSR_Press_Release_FINAL.pdf.

2 2013 Cone Communications/Echo Global CSR Study: http://www.conecomm.com/2013-global-csr-study-release.

3 Society for Human Resource Management, BSR and Aurosoorya Report: http://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Pages/AdvancingSustainabilityHR%E2%80%99sRole.aspx.

4 Orange County Business Journal 2014 Giving Guide: http://www.cbjonline.com/a1ocbj/supplements/Giving-Guide_1214.pdf.

About Working Wardrobes

Working Wardrobes is an independent nonprofit organization empowers men, women, veterans, and young adults overcoming difficult challenges to confidently enter the workforce and achieve self-sufficiency. The organization provides career training, job placement assistance, and professional wardrobe services in an environment of dignity and respect.

Since 1990, Working Wardrobes has grown to serve over 75,000 men, women, veterans, and young adults overcoming difficult challenges including alcohol and substance abuse, prison re-entry, homelessness, catastrophic illness, and traumatic financial losses. It assists CalWorks recipients, clients of social service agencies, and individuals in 60 shelters or programs in Orange County, Los Angeles, San Diego, and the Inland Empire. The Working Wardrobes social enterprise model serves as an example of self-sustainability to organizations nationwide.

Working Wardrobes’ current board of directors includes (in alphabetical order by last name): Derek Benson, Union Bank; Jodi Chavez, Accounting Principials; Anna Conrekas, US Bank; John Dickson, QBE North America, Inc.; Mandi Dossin, DGWB; Eric Eng, Experian; Harry Humphries, GSGI, Inc.; Bob Hurley; Stephen Kelley, Health Essentials, LLC; Michelle Koontz, Fluor; Darryl Martin, Sentinel Offender Systems, LLC; Emily Reynolds, ADP; Jerri Rosen, CEO, Working Wardrobes; Parker Schweich, Dorsey & Whitney, LLP; Jeffrey Shepherd, Hughes Marino, Inc.; Kim Shepherd, Decision Toolbox; Rich Shugg, Autobytel, Inc.; Carrie Swanson, The Boeing Company; Sandy Theriault, UPS; Patrick Tillich, Park West Landscape, Inc.; and Mike N. Vo, Law Offices of Mike N. Vo.

About OneOC

OneOC, formerly Volunteer Center Orange County, is a nonprofit 501c3 organization committed to accelerating nonprofit success through volunteer, training, consulting and business services. Serving Orange County, California, OneOC provides support and solutions to more than 650 nonprofit organizations and community initiatives each year. Building on a 52-year history of mobilizing volunteer action, the organization announced its new name on September 15, 2010 to signal the expansion of its integrated service offerings to help nonprofits become as effective and efficient about their mission as they are passionate. OneOC is affiliated with Points of Lights Institute and HandsOn Network, enabling participation in national community service initiatives and connection to a larger movement of change. For more information, visit http://www.OneOC.org.







Jordan Lawrence to Sponsor Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC) Webcast about Meeting Obligations of the Civil Investigative Demand

St. Louis, MO (PRWEB) November 27, 2013

Companies running inside the customer financial services industry continue to be getting their sea legs with regards to preparing for Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) investigations plus meeting the responsibilities of the Civil Investigative Demand (CID). CID subjects need to be mobilized to instantly identify, gather plus analyze big amounts of records plus info to satisfy CID deadlines.

Today, Jordan Lawrence, an Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC) Alliance Partner, together with Dallas-based law fast Locke Lord announced they might sponsor a December 12th ACC webcast about preparing for a CID. The webcast might feature Tony Alexis, Deputy Assistant Director for Enforcement Field Litigation at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The session may address the CFPB research task plus timeline plus provide attitude found on the challenges plus possible blind spots businesses could face whenever presented with an research or discovery obligation.

Register Now

About The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) mission is to create markets for customer financial items plus services function for Americans – whether they are applying for a mortgage, selecting amidst credit cards, or utilizing any quantity of additional customer financial items. Above all, this signifies guaranteeing which customers receive the info they require to result in the financial decisions they believe are right for themselves plus their families – which costs are well-defined up front, which dangers are noticeable, plus which nothing is buried inside fine print. In a market which functions, customers ought to be capable to create direct comparisons amidst goods plus no provider ought to be capable to utilize unfair, deceptive, or abusive practices.

About The Association of Corporate Counsel

The Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC) is a worldwide bar organization which promotes the prevalent specialist plus company interests of in-house counsel that function for businesses, associations plus additional private-sector companies from info, knowledge, networking chances plus advocacy initiatives. We expect plus recognize the requirements of the in-house bar; aid members deliver services to their business customers efficiently; improve the worth of in-house services; influence the practice of law because it affects the in-house bar; plus deliver a blend of relevant, timely services including info, knowledge, networking plus advocacy. With over 30,000 members employed by over 10,000 companies inside over 75 nations, ACC links its members to every additional plus to the persons plus resources needed for their individual plus specialist development.

About Jordan Lawrence

For over 25 years, Jordan Lawrence has worked with all the worlds premier firms to develop plus apply records administration programs which function. Jordan Lawrence delivers proven, swiftly plus affordable services which enable any firm meet active plus ever changing legal plus company specifications associated to records administration plus info governance.

About Locke Lord

Locke Lord is a full-service, global law fast with offices inside Atlanta, Austin, Chicago, Dallas, Hong Kong, Houston, London, Los Angeles, New Orleans, NY, Sacramento, San Francisco plus Washington, D.C.